Scholarly Journal Articles, Book Chapters

Queering Musicking: An Introduction,” in MUSICultures: Journal of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music. Eds. C. Marsh and C. Jennex. Forthcoming in Winter 2021. (with C. Jennex)

“Imagining Queer Resistance: Raves as a Site for Pleasure, Friendships, and Resistance - A Case Study,” in MUSICultures: Journal of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music. Eds. C. Marsh and C. Jennex. Forthcoming in Winter 2021.

Indigenous and Diaspora Reverberations: Hip Hop in Canada and Canadian Hip Hop. An Introduction,” in We Still Here: Hip Hop North of the 49th Parallel. (Co-edited Marsh and Campbell).. McGill/Queen’s University Press. 2020, pp. 3-16. (with M. Campbell)

 

Celebration, Resistance, and Action - Beat Nation: Hip Hop as Indigenous Culture,” in We Still Here: Hip Hop North of the 49th Parallel. (Co-edited Marsh and Campbell). McGill/Queen’s University Press. 2020, pp. 46-64.

 

The Hip Hop We See. The Hip Hop We Do.: Powerful and Fierce Women in Hip Hop in Canada,” in We Still Here: Hip Hop North of the 49th Parallel. (Co-edited Marsh and Campbell).. McGill/Queen’s University Press. 2020, pp. 221-242.

When She Plays We Hear A Revolution: Girls Rock Regina - A Feminist Intervention,” in IASPM Journal of Popular Music 8/1. Fall 2018, pp. 88-102.

Profile of the Interactive Media and Performance (IMP) Labs - Interview with Dr Charity Marsh,” in Critical Studies in Improvisation/ Études critiques en improvisation, Vol 10, No 1 (2014). By Dr. Rebecca Caines.

In the Middle of Nowhere: Little Miss Higgins Sings the Blues in Nokomis, Saskatchewan,” in Mind the Gap: Saskatchewan’s Cultural Spaces. Eds. R Rogers and C. Ramsay, Regina: University of Regina Press, 2014, pp. 413-441.

Hip Hop as Methodology: Ways of Knowing,” in Canadian Journal of Communication. Vol. 37, 2012, pp. 193-203.

Bits and Pieces of Truth: Storytelling, Identity, and Hip Hop in Saskatchewan,” in Aboriginal Music in Contemporary Canada: Echoes and Exchanges. Eds. A. Hoefnagels and B. Diamond. Montreal/ Kingston: McGill/ Queen’s University Press, 2012, pp. 346-371.

Keepin’ it Real?: Masculinity, Race, and Media Representations of (Gangsta’ Rap in) Regina, in Making it Like a Man: Masculinities in Canadian Arts and Culture. Ed. C. Ramsay. Wilfred Laurier Press. Spring 2011, 149-170.

“What it feels like for a girl: Metaphor, Transgression, and the Triumph of Madonna’s Imaginary Cyborgs,” Reprint in Canadian Perspectives in Sexuality Studies. Ed. D. Naugler. Oxford University Press, 2012, pp. 340-348.

Spaces of Violence and Sites of Resistance: Music, Media and Performance: An Introduction,” in MUSICultures: Journal of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music. Eds. C. Marsh and G. Smith. Vol. 38, 2011, pp. 1-6. With G. Smith.

 

Globalization, Identity, and Youth Resistance: Kenya’s Hip Hop Parliament,” in MUSICultures Journal of the Canadian Society for Traditional Music. Vol. 38, 2011, pp. 132-147. With S. Petty.

 

Don’t Call Me Eskimo: The Politics of Hip Hop Culture in Nunavut,” In MUSICultures: The Canadian Journal for Traditional Music. Fall, 2010, pp. 110-129.

 

The Politics of Academic Fandom.” In Studies in Music. London: University of Western, Serge Lacasse, Ed. Fall 2010.

 

What it feels like for a girl: Metaphor, Transgression, and the Triumph of Madonna’s Imaginary Cyborgs,” in Atlantis: A Women’s Studies Journal. 34.1, 2009, pp. 111-120.

The Nature/Culture Binary Opposition Dismantled in the Music of Madonna and Björk, Reprint in Cultural Studies: An  Anthology. Ed. Michael Ryan. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2008, pp. 850-866.

In & Out of the Classroom: Reflections on Identity, Technology, and the Radio Project,” In Intersections: Canadian Journal of Music. (26/2), 2007, pp. 81-96.

 

‘Understand Us Before You End Us’: Regulation, Governmentality, and the Confessional Practices of Raving Bodies,” In Popular Music. (Vol. 25/3), Cambridge University Press, 2006, pp. 415-430.

Performing Femininity as a Transgressive Act through the Dissolution of ‘Real’ and ‘Imaginary’: Björk's Performance as Selma in Lars Von Trier's Dancer in the Dark.” In Scandinavian-Canadian Studies. (Volume 14), 2002, pp.104-129. 

The Nature/Culture Binary Opposition Dismantled in the Music of Madonna and Björk.”  In Music and Technoculture, René Lysloff, ed. New England: Wesleyan Press, 2003, pp.182-203. With Melissa West.

DJ Club.” Women and Music in America Since 1900: An Encyclopedia, Kristine H. Burns, Ed. Westport, Connecticut and London: Greenwood Press, 2002, pp. 158-159.

© 2020 by Dr Charity Marsh